The sad part is that this wasn’t a unanimous decision.
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So we have a couple of Supreme Court rulings today, and depending on where you look, they are very, very narrow. In fact, in some cases probably meaningless, except, as far as they might provide political impetus for the left to reengage in the supposed Republican War on Women.

Now, let’s look at the Hobby Lobby case first off. And I have to issue a caveat here. These rulings came out just this morning and I have spent as much time as I’ve had here getting into it and trying to figure them out but there’s gonna be a lot more to learn as time goes on today. So I need to reserve the right here to get something slightly incorrect if indeed it is. I doubt it, but I may not have been able to absorb everything that’s relevant in these two rulings prior to the program having begun, but that’s why there’s tomorrow and, in fact, why there is later today.

Now, at first blush — and I read one of the preparatory pieces about the Hobby Lobby case, and it was in the Drive-By Media. And of course the point made about it was that even if the court ruled in favor of Hobby Lobby, it was going to be very, very narrow. It was not going to be earth-shattering, it was not gonna be landmark, because it was only gonna affect a few corporations, those corporations which are called “closely held.”

Now, what is a “closely held” corporation? It basically means when the owners run it. The Hobby Lobby is owned and operated by a family, not a gigantic public company with all kinds of stockholders and massive numbers of boards of directors. And so the court in that case said those companies have a right not to have their religious beliefs violated by federal legislation, in this case Obamacare, and the contraception mandate. Obamacare requires that all employers provide contraception insurance coverage to their employees. And the Hobby Lobby, “We don’t believe in that. We don’t believe in abortion. We don’t believe in contraception and we don’t believe the federal government can tell us that they can make us violate our religious views,” and the Supreme Court agreed with them today.

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