There are certainly time we should profile.
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Remember the “Beltway Sniper” attacks in 2002, when a lunatic was driving around the Washington D.C. area picking off people with a rifle? The FBI immediately went to work on catching him and put together a profile based on their knowledge of these types of killings. The suspect was a white male, early to late 20′s, with military experience and driving a pickup truck or van. In other words: me.cropredneck

For the better part of three weeks that October with ten random people murdered and another three critically wounded in the rampage, an artist’s rendering of what investigators figured the perpetrator might look like splashed across network broadcasts and appeared above the fold in every newspaper in America. Although the science is not precise and was still just a guess, the analysis was based on solid law enforcement methodology and by experts in behavioral evidence. The fact that they were all convinced the killer was someone who looked like me didn’t bother me one bit – I and every other white male with military training in a pickup truck only wanted him caught (and executed).

There was no ACLU or “I got my feelings hurt” lawyers screaming about my state of mind on the whole issue of profiling and there’s a good reason for that: I’m a white male. We’re about the only group of people it’s okay to profile for and that’s just wrong. Political correctness is a lousy reason to limit the tactic to just white males. Authorities should be using every tool they have when investigating crime or fighting terrorism and that includes profiling everybody when it’s apropos. Thankfully the Beltway Sniper and his accomplice were apprehended despite neither of them resembling yours truly. D.C. Police Chief Charles Ramsey laid it out in no uncertain terms: “We were looking for a white van with white people, and we ended up with a blue car with black people.”

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