Less than a year ago, voters went to the polls in Ohio and resoundingly rejected Obamacare’s individual mandate. Actually, that’s an understatement. Voters in all 88 counties of Ohio rejected it, and in all but seven of those counties they did so by a margin of at least 20 percentage points. Even in Cuyahoga County, where Cleveland is located and where Barack Obama beat John McCain by a margin of better than two-to-one (68 to 30 percent), voters not only rejected Obamacare’s individual mandate but did so by a margin of 16 points (58 to 42 percent).

To be sure, Ohioans don’t have the power to cancel out Obamacare’s individual mandate any more than the residents of any other single state do (unless, of course, Ohio becomes the deciding state in the presidential election). If Obamacare isn’t repealed, then its individual mandate would be imposed on Americans in every state. The Ohio vote, therefore, was essentially symbolic, but what it demonstrates is this: The individual mandate is likely the most unpopular part of President Obama’s horribly unpopular centerpiece legislation. As such, it’s perhaps his greatest political vulnerability.

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