You know, things change generationally. But I got fired, and it was the worst thing to happen, ’cause once you got fired nobody would ever hire you again. You were forever stigmatized! You got fired and you may as well write the scarlet letter on your forehead. That was it. I’ll never forget when I had to call and tell him that I got fired. All he could say was, “You got fired! You’re fired!” It was like “FIRED” was a title. It wasn’t, “You were fired,” it was, “You’re FIRED!” He spat it out.

It was the absolute worst news he coulda had, the worst thing that coulda happened. It proved everything he always thought in telling me I was gonna be a failure ’cause I didn’t go to college. And then I had to tell him six other times. (laughing) I had to tell him a total of seven times! But the point is there was… (interruption) My mom was not happy about it. But she thought he was being a little mean in the way he was dealing with me about it. She thought that I needed to be pep-talked and inspired rather than beat down.

Those were just child-rearing philosophical differences. Anyway, the point is that back in the Great Depression, there wasn’t any welfare. You got fired and there wasn’t anywhere to go. It was painful. It was painful psychologically. It was painful. If you cared what people thought about you, it was one of the worst things could happen to you. And of course economically, you had to depend on family, church, or what have you for survival.

My only point is it’s not that way today, and that’s all this guy is saying. Most of the people where he lives don’t work, but they’re eating. These are transformations that have been slow in coming, and they’re occurring so slowly that they’re not causing a national outrage.

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