One reason why the GOP lost in 2008 was they were trying to be “nice guys” and “compassionate conservatives” (e.g. Huckabee, McCain). But they didn’t recognize that the opponents weren’t nice and would stoop to anything to win – name calling; lies; voter fraud; etc. The GOP didn’t want to stoop their level, thinking that America would recognize their goodness and elect them. And the Luntz polls seemed to validate that people didn’t like politicians going negative on their opponents.

This time we can’t make the same mistake. The stakes are too high. We need to be realistic and not seemingly idealistic if we want to win. Football players on the field don’t stop and compliment their opponents because their opponents would take advantage of that weakness, being that their only goal is to win … even if they have to cheat, which they often do (e.g. the “bounty” scandal with the New Orleans not-so-saintly Saints, in which they paid their players to actually injure the opponents).

Therefore the strategy should be:
(1) Don’t say anything good about Obama.
(2) Just point out his faults.
(3) Don’t say anything bad about our nominee.
(4) Only point out his good points.
(5) No pessimistic talk.

And public “perception” is what usually wins elections in a battle of sound bites. Therefore we need to continually point out the bad things that Obama and the dems have done so that the public clearly understands WHY the dem policies are bad. I think that is the main job of the election. But we can say those things without emotion, which could cause red flags and be counter productive. The clear truth objectively spoken is very powerful.

And it is objectively true that the dem’s economic and social policies have hugely lowered the quality of life in this country. Therefore it is a very important mission to get them out and let order be restored. And saying even one nice thing about them doesn’t help. I’m tired of hearing how great a family man Obama is. And even if that’s true and not just a calculated image, great family men don’t necessarily make great presidents. And I’m tired of hearing about Romney’s Mormonism. We aren’t electing a theologian-in-chief, we are electing someone who would have the economic know how and social goodness to steer this country back in the right direction.

I mean, do sports teams base their decisions on who to hire or draft on someone’s religion or if they are nice? No. They hire if the person can do a good job. And BO and the dems have been a colossal failure. So enough about religion (and I’m a very religious person and would love more than anything else that Jesus was the president). And it needs to be recognized that liberal policies are very ANTI-family.

So even if we think that our nominee isn’t perfect, we should follow the strategy that I’ve laid out here because we know that our candidate does represent good and good functioning far more than the democrats do. And because democrats vote as a block, we should not vote for even one of them. This is not to even mention the critical power that the president has to appoint Supreme Court Justices (who strangely also vote as a block. I mean if something is legally obvious, then why do we have so many 5 to 4 decisions? That seems to say that good legal academics is usually sacrificed for political persuasion).

The potential GOP nominees have already torn down each other a lot in the process of coming up with who our nominee will be. They’ve given the dems a lot of fodder for the main election. The sooner we can make those attacks a distant memory the better and just solely focus our attack on dems.

Byline: Dennis Marcellino is the author of The Plague Of Liberalism, which can be seen at and THE SOLUTIONS, which can be seen at and Addiction Free Forever, which can be seen at