CALLER: Yeah. Most of the expertise that exists in the country and the world today in algae is in the laboratory. A lot of theoretical aspects of what you can do with algae, perhaps a hundred times make more oil out of algae than corn, things like that. The problem is actually implementing that in the field and doing it in real life situations with the real circumstances of nature and so forth. Doing it that way you find that you can, in fact, produce algae that can produce biofuels. The problem is you can’t do it at an economical price. There’s a lot of factors that go into this, one of which of course is selection of algae and so forth, which, you know, obviously is hard. People think of algae as the scum in ponds and so forth. And actually that’s not what we’re really dealing with. Algae, if you looked at it, living algae is a micro-organism that’s so small when you look at it, if you had a glass of it it would be clear like limeade, it doesn’t look scummy because it’s living. So the big problem is getting the algae out of the water. Now, we have certain technologies that can do that, but it’s very expensive, and then we have technologies, the other thing you’ve gotta do is get the oil out of the algae, and that also can be done, but it’s very expensive. So unless oil, you know, gets to $300 a barrel, none of this technology, at the moment, is gonna be very effective.

RUSH: Let me ask you two questions. First question, does burning algae, using it in this way emit carbon dioxide?

CALLER: Yeah, it’s a —

RUSH: So it emits a greenhouse gas?

CALLER: Yeah. Well, it’s carbon dioxide, sure.

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