Ladies and gentlemen, I always go back and forth on whether to mention things said about me. Because it’s inevitable that I will elevate whoever it is that’s doing the talking about me. So it’s something I have to judge issue by issue, knowing full well that I can turn a nobody into a somebody by mentioning them.

You don’t want to do that, but at the same time if the nobody says something that offers an opportunity to make a point to millions of people, then you roll the dice on elevating the nobody into a somebody. Now, the nobody in this case is a nobody to you. He is a somebody to the intellectual elite. His name is Peter Berkowitz, and he’s on the staff — he’s a thinker; he has a chair where he sits and thinks — at the Hoover Institute, which is a conservative think tank at Stanford. He’s out there with Victor Davis Hanson and Thomas Sowell and a lot of other bright people, and he wrote a piece in the Wall Street Journal. I think it was yesterday.

“The Myth of Conservative Purity — Adam Smith, the Founding Fathers, Ronald Reagan all practiced the art of wise compromise. With the opening of the fall political season and tonight’s Republican candidate debate, expect influential conservative voices to clamor for fellow conservatives to set aside half-measures, eschew conciliation, and adhere to conservative principle in its pristine purity. But what does fidelity to conservatism’s core convictions mean? Superstar radio talk-show host Rush Limbaugh has, with characteristic bravado, championed a take-no-prisoners approach. In late July, as the debt-ceiling debate built to its climax, he understandably exhorted House Speaker John Boehner to stand strong and rightly praised the tea party for ‘putting country before party.’

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