One by one, all but seven states have succumbed to pressure to adopt national academic standards. But in a recent bid to retain local control, members of a regional school board in Massachusetts asked state officials to reconsider that decision, according to Education Week.

The Massachusetts school board expressed concerns that the Common Core State Standards, endorsed by the Obama administration, would result in the loss of local control. Its opposition is the latest knock on national standards, following criticism from leaders in South Carolina, Texas and Virginia. (Click here to learn more about restoring federalism in education.)

The move in Massachusetts began in December when the Tantasqua Regional School Board requested that lawmakers draft a bill to override the state board’s decision to adopt Common Core State Standards. A little more than a week ago, on Jan. 21, Republican State Rep. Todd M. Smola filed legislation to do just that. State Rep. Anne M. Gobi and State Sen. Stephen M. Brewer, both Democrats, co-sponsored the bill, which would retain Massachusetts’ own standards and its exam, the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System, or MCAS.

The bill is unlikely to pass the Democrat-controlled legislature, but it reflects a wider skepticism of the national standards movement — skepticism rooted in the spirit of federalism.

Continue reading on